How does a 35M yacht really differ from a 60M yacht?

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Capability

A sixty metre yacht is likely to have truly trans-continental range, meaning relocating from one ocean to another is a case of setting course for another part of the world. In the case of a thirty five metre yacht it may be more practical to load the yacht onto a transport ship and have the yacht itself relocated. The major advantage of a thirty five metre yacht is that it will be able to access a greater number of smaller ports and marinas than a sixty metre vessel, putting more locations directly at the stern of your yacht.

 

Construction

At the sixty metre mark, yachts are likely to be built using the same methods as large commercial ships, meaning a steel hull with enormous structural integrity. The yacht will also have to meet more stringent commercial standards and more than likely be over 500GT and therefore built to very different regulatory requirements. A thirty five metre yacht can be built of steel, aluminium or composite materials, the latter being more conducive to high-performance yachting, but not as well suited to sailing in rougher seas.

 

Crewing  

Crewing requirements for a sixty metre yacht are significant, with the number onboard usually being around the 12-15 mark, and it’s likely that senior crew will be contracted on ‘rotation’ basis. This means they spend a certain length of time on board and a certain length on leave, a reflection of their seniority and skills, but also increasing the monthly payroll. On a thirty five metre yacht the crew numbers can range for 6 to 8 depending on the available cabin space. The crew structure is more fluid and there is likely to be some cross-over in the job roles. Salaries for each senior positions, i.e. Captain, will be less than their equivalents on the sixty meter yacht, but the juniors, i.e. deckhands, can expect the same as this is, almost, industry standard.

 

Entertainment possibility

One of the biggest advantages of moving up the yachting ladder to the sixty metre mark is the possibility to entertain on a truly grand scale. Groups of guests or individuals will be able to find their own personal space on deck or below. The yacht’s volume increased dramatically and not only will the cabins be larger, but the yacht will go from one salon on the thirty five meter, to two salons not the sixty, offering various difference zones to be used for different purposes, as well as the addition of multiple dining locations. Options for additional equipment such as helidecks, large tenders and the most exotic of ‘toys’ also become possible with the added technical and tender garage locations.